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Novak Djokovic set to be deported and miss Australian Open after his visa is cancelled again

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Tennis superstar Novak Djokovic has had his visa cancelled for a second time and is set to be deported, crushing his hopes of staying in Melbourne to defend his Australian Open crown.

Immigration Minister Alex Hawke used his discretionary powers to cancel Djokovic’s visa on Friday, four days after the federal government had backed down on sending him home. 

Officials said the world No. 1, who is unvaccinated for COVID-19, may pose a risk to the community, dashing his hopes of competing for his 21st grand slam. 

Shortly after the announcement, Prime Minister Scott Morrison released a statement saying ‘Australians have made many sacrifices during this pandemic, and they rightly expect the result of those sacrifices to be protected.

‘This is what the Minister is doing in taking this action today.’  

The cancellation means Djokovic could be barred from a new Australian visa for three years, except under certain circumstances. 

Djokovic’s legal team was reportedly told of his visa cancellation 20 minutes before the media, and is now in discussions with the Federal Government. If his lawyers do appeal, they want it to be a ‘streamlined trial’ to be completed by Sunday, The Age reported.

Djokovic has been advised to attend an interview with immigration officials on Saturday – and it is believed he will remain out of detention until that is completed. 

Tennis superstar Novak Djokovic has had his visa cancelled for a second time and is set to be deported, despite a judge finding he could stay in Melbourne to defend his Australian Open crown

Legal experts say it would be difficult – if not impossible – for Djokovic to successfully challenge a visa cancellation decision made personally by the Immigration Minister.   

Immigration lawyer Kian Bone told the ABC that it would be ‘extremely difficult’ for Djokovic’s lawyers to get court orders over the weekend to enable him to play in the Australian Open next week.

‘For Djokovic to get the outcomes he needs to play would be extremely difficult to obtain over the weekend,’ Mr Bone said.

Immigration Minister Alex Hawke was handed the poisoned chalice of deciding whether Novak Djokovic would be allowed to stay in Australia after his visa was originally cancelled upon arrival

In a statement Mr Hawke said: ‘Today I exercised my power under section 133C(3) of the Migration Act to cancel the visa held by Mr Novak Djokovic on health and good order grounds, on the basis that it was in the public interest to do so. 

‘This decision followed orders by the Federal Circuit and Family Court on 10 January 2022, quashing a prior cancellation decision on procedural fairness grounds. 

‘In making this decision, I carefully considered information provided to me by the Department of Home Affairs, the Australian Border Force and Mr Djokovic.  

‘The Morrison Government is firmly committed to protecting Australia’s borders, particularly in relation to the Covid-19 pandemic. 

‘I thank the officers of the Department of Home Affairs and the Australian Border Force who work every day to serve Australia’s interests in increasingly challenging operational environment.’    

Djokovic, pictured with his wife Jelena, could be barred from entering Australia for three years following Alex Hawke's decision

Djokovic, pictured with his wife Jelena, could be barred from entering Australia for three years following Alex Hawke’s decision 

Mr Hawke’s decision comes just three days out from the start of the Australian Open on January 17 where Djokovic had hoped to become the most successful male player of all time.  

The likelihood of more court action by the 34-year-old Serb, who has already won the Open nine times, will throw the grand slam tournament into further disarray. 

Djokovic could be held in detention in Melbourne while the Open goes on without the world’s top ranked player, creating a nightmare scenario for Tennis Australia.

In the delayed draw on Thursday afternoon, Djokovic was drawn to play against fellow Serb Miomir Kecmanovic, who is ranked world No.78. 

Protests have been predicted and the federal government can expect an international backlash in response to its decision, particularly from Serbia.

Djokovic concedes he provided false information on his travel entry form, which incorrectly claimed he had not travelled in the 14 days before his arrival in Melbourne, despite visiting Spain

Protests have been predicted and the federal government can expect an international backlash in response to its decision, particularly from Serbia. Members of Melbourne's Serbian community are pictured on Monday

Protests have been predicted and the federal government can expect an international backlash in response to its decision, particularly from Serbia. Members of Melbourne’s Serbian community are pictured on Monday

Calls for Djokovic to be deported increased after inconsistencies emerged between his sworn evidence on immigration documents and social media posts. 

Djokovic, who is not vaccinated against Covid, was denied a visa to enter Australia on January 6 by a Border Force official but that decision was overturned by the Federal Circuit Court on Monday. 

He has since admitted providing false information on his travel entry form, which incorrectly claimed he had not travelled in the 14 days before his arrival in Melbourne, despite visiting Spain.

Djokovic has also conceded he breached Serbia’s isolation rules after learning he had tested positive to the virus on December 16.   

Djokovic said he had been interviewed in person by a French newspaper while infected with Covid, and blamed his agent for the ‘administrative error’ on his travel entry form. 

Discrepancies emerged after Djokovic issued a lengthy Instagram statement on Wednesday to clarify ‘misinformation’ about his movements while positive with Covid.

‘I want to address the continuing misinformation about my activities and attendance at events in December in the lead-up to my positive Covid test result,’ it began.

‘I want to emphasise that I have tried very hard to ensure the safety of everyone and my compliance with testing obligations.’

THE THREE ‘INCONSISTENCIES’ IN NOVAK DJOKOVIC’S STORY 

1. WHEN DID THE WORLD NO. 1 FIND OUT HE WAS POSITIVE? AND WAS HIS COVID TEST MANIPULATED?

There are serious questions about when the anti-vaxxer learned of his positive Covid test. A sworn affidavit to the Federal Circuit Court claimed the tennis star was ‘tested and diagnosed’ for Covid on December 16.

This contradicts his Instagram statement on Wednesday, after pictures emerged of the Serbian star at an event in Belgrade on December 17 presenting awards to children without a mask.

He said he only learned of his positive test shortly after the meet and greet.

Djokovic was told he could fly into Melbourne on the basis he tested positive to the virus in Serbia on December 16 and then negative six days later.

But German publication Der Spiegel claims when its reporter entered the QR code for his December 16 test into the official Serbian health database at 1.19pm on Monday, the result came back negative.

An hour later at 2.33pm, the scan returned a positive result – in what could simply be a quirk of the system.

A negative result would have invalidated Djokovic’s claim to enter Australia on a temporary working visa for the tournament.

2. DJOKOVIC BREACHED COVID ISOLATION RULES IN SERBIA

The 34-year-old disclosed he had attended an event with children while he was Covid positive, but claimed he didn’t know he was infected until afterwards.

He had taken a PCR test the day before and was awaiting results, but said he tested negative to a rapid antigen test so went along.

Djokovic has been the subject of intense scrutiny for presenting awards to kids at an event in Belgrade on December 17 – a day after recording a positive result for the virus.

The Serbian maintained he was not aware of his diagnosis until shortly after but did admit to conducting an in-person interview with French newspaper L’Équipe knowing he was positive.

He called his decision to go ahead with the Q and A an ‘error in judgement’ but said he maintained social distancing and wore a mask.

Under Serbian law, where anyone Covid positive must isolate for 14 days, such a breach can carry a maximum sentence of three years behind bars.

3. THE TENNIS STAR PROVIDED FALSE INFORMATION ON HIS DECLARATION FORM AND TO THE COURT

Djokovic is alleged to have written incorrect information on his landing card telling Border Force he had not travelled in the past 14 days despite visiting Spain.

He later said this was an administrative mistake make by his agent, who ‘ticked the incorrect box’.

He also declared he was ‘tested and diagnosed’ for Covid on December 16 in a court document but now says he learnt of his positive test on December 17.

 

Djokovic admitted doing a interview and photo shoot L’Equipe while infected with Covid as he had a long standing commitment to do so.

‘I cancelled all other events except for the L’Equipe interview,’ Djokovic said.

‘I felt obliged to go ahead and conduct the L’Équipe interview as I didn’t want to let the journalist down, but did ensure I socially distanced and wore a mask except when my photograph was taken.’

He also addressed the ‘human errors’ on his travel declaration which failed to declare that he had visited Spain in the 14 days before his arrival at Melbourne Airport.

‘This was submitted by my support team on my behalf – as I told immigration officials on my arrival – and my agent sincerely apologises for the administrative mistake in ticking the incorrect box about my previous travel before coming to Australia,’ Djokovic continued.

Fans became increasingly agitated when their hero failed to emerge from his lawyers' office on Monday evening - before it became clear he had somehow sneaked out undetected

Fans became increasingly agitated when their hero failed to emerge from his lawyers’ office on Monday evening – before it became clear he had somehow sneaked out undetected

‘This was a human error and certainly not deliberate. We are living in challenging times in a global pandemic and sometimes these mistakes can occur. 

‘Today, my team has provided additional information to the Australian government to clarify this ‘matter.’

Djokovic had been granted a medical exemption to play in Melbourne by Tennis Australia. He believed he had met criteria set by Australia’s advisory board on immunisation and been given a federal government declaration he could travel.

He took his case to the Federal Circuit Court where the federal government agreed to settle the case and Judge Anthony Kelly quashed the cancellation of Djokovic’s visa on Monday.

Judge Kelly found that tearing up Djokovic’s visa had been unreasonable and he had not been given enough time by Australian Border Force officials to respond to their concerns. 

Having beaten the Minister for Home Affairs, Karen Andrews, Djokovic then had to contend with Mr Hawke, a close ally of Prime Minister Scott Morrison.  

It was originally speculated Mr Hawke had just four hours to make a decision on Djokovic's visa after it was reinstated by a Federal Circuit Court judge on Monday

It was originally speculated Mr Hawke had just four hours to make a decision on Djokovic’s visa after it was reinstated by a Federal Circuit Court judge on Monday

‘Following today’s Federal Circuit and Family Court determination on a procedural ground, it remains within Immigration Minister Hawke’s discretion to consider cancelling Mr Djokovic’s visa,’ a spokesman for Mr Hawke had said on Monday night.

‘… The minister is currently considering the matter.’ 

Judge Kelly had said on Monday if the government intended to cancel Djokovic’s visa the Federal Circuit Court must be given ample notice to prepare for future proceedings.

There were jubilant scenes on the streets on Melbourne on Monday night after Novak Djokovic was freed from immigration detention

There were jubilant scenes on the streets on Melbourne on Monday night after Novak Djokovic was freed from immigration detention

Fans dance and sing outside an immigration detention hotel where Serbian Novak Djokovic was confined in Melbourne

Fans dance and sing outside an immigration detention hotel where Serbian Novak Djokovic was confined in Melbourne

Mr Hawke had three options open to him.

He could have let Djokovic stay in Australia to compete in the Open, he could re-cancel his visa and ban the star from coming to Australia for three years, or he could cancel the visa but not impose a three-year ban.

Either of the second and third options was likely to lead to more legal action. 

The Australia Open starts on January 17 when Djokovic wanted to launch his bid to become the most-decorated men’s singles player of all time. 

Djokovic is currently level with Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal on 20 grand slam titles. Federer is out of this year’s tournament with injury, while Nadal will be playing.

Novak Djokovic is still in limbo as immigration minister refuses to rule out cancelling his visa - but posted this picture of himself practicing at Rod Laver area just hours after he was finally released from detention after a five-day-long ordeal

Novak Djokovic is still in limbo as immigration minister refuses to rule out cancelling his visa – but posted this picture of himself practicing at Rod Laver area just hours after he was finally released from detention after a five-day-long ordeal

Members of the Serbian community (pictured) are seen marching through Melbourne on Monday night, with the scene soon becoming violent as protesters crashed with police - leading to many being pepper-sprayed

Members of the Serbian community (pictured) are seen marching through Melbourne on Monday night, with the scene soon becoming violent as protesters crashed with police – leading to many being pepper-sprayed

Djokovic first responded on Monday to the federal government’s failed cancellation of his visa, saying he still wanted to compete at the Australian Open next week. 

‘I’m pleased and grateful that the judge overturned my visa cancellation,’ he wrote on Twitter. 

‘Despite all that has happened, I want to stay and try to compete.

‘I remain focused on that. I flew here to play at one of the most important events we have in front of the amazing fans.’ 

Djokovic’s family said in a press conference in Serbia that he had returned to training on the tennis court and the ‘rule of law has won’.

His father Srdjan said: ‘I call on Queen Elizabeth, the leader of the Commonwealth, to intervene and protect the human rights of my son and to stop the political prosecution carried out against him since he came to Australia.’ 

This black car, which many fans were convinced was taking Djokovic away from his lawyer's office on Monday night, was quickly surrounded as police tried to keep them back

This black car, which many fans were convinced was taking Djokovic away from his lawyer’s office on Monday night, was quickly surrounded as police tried to keep them back

Australian Border Force was investigating claims Djokovic allegedly lied on his entry form by claiming he had not travelled in the 14 days leading up to his arrival in Melbourne.

All travellers arriving in Australia are asked if they have ‘travelled or will travel in the 14 days prior to your flight to Australia’.

They are also warned: ‘Giving false or misleading information is a serious offence. You may also be liable to a civil penalty for giving false or misleading information.’

EXCERPT OF NOVAK DJOKOVIC VISA INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Interview #1 begun at 12.21am on January 6:

INTERVIEWER: Thank you. So when I ask you what were your reasons for travelling to Australia today?

DJOKOVIC: I’m a professional tennis player and the main reason for me coming to Australia is participating in the Australian Open in Melbourne, Victoria.

INTERVIEWER: Thank you. Now question regarding your vaccination, are you vaccinated for COVID-19? Not vaccinated?

DJOKOVIC: I am not vaccinated.

INTERVIEWER: Thank you. Have you ever had COVID?

DJOKOVIC: Yes. I had COVID twice, I had COVID in June 2020 and I had COVID recently in – I was tested positive – PCR –16th of December 2021.

DJOKOVIC: I have the documents as well to confirm that if you want I can provide

INTERVIEWER: Thank you. I’ll just make a photocopy of those documents.

Djokovic ticked ‘No’ in response to the question, however that appears to be in conflict with the timeline of his recent movements documented on social media.

He appears to have been playing tennis in the streets of Belgrade on December 25 and on December 31, footage emerged of Djokovic having a hit out in south-east Spain.

The maximum penalty for providing false or misleading information to the Australian government is 12 months’ imprisonment.

The Department of Home Affairs claimed Djokovic had relied on out-of-date Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation advice to enter the country. 

Djokovic’s visa was originally cancelled upon his arrival at Melbourne Airport and he was held in a cheap hotel under an immigration detention order while he waited for his appeal to be held.

Then followed five days of chaotic bureaucracy and finger pointing between the federal government, the Victorian government and Tennis Australia.

After hours of legal argument Judge Kelly ordered Djokovic be freed from detention at Melbourne’s Park Hotel by no later than 5.46pm on Monday. 

He quashed the decision to tear up Djokovic’s visa and ordered that his passport and other personal belongings be returned.

Opposition Home Affairs spokeswoman Kristina Keneally has described the saga as a lose-lose situation for the federal government and said it made Australia ‘look like a bit of a joke’ on the world stage.

‘The Morrison government looks like a pack of idiots that couldn’t organise a meat tray at the local raffle,’ Ms Keneally told Sky News on Tuesday.

‘It would be a joke, except the consequences here are so serious.’

Serbia’s parliamentary speaker Ivica Dacic had voiced his exasperation that the case was ongoing, saying ‘the process should have ended when the court ruled on the matter’. 

‘The Australian authorities have obviously chosen to deport him, which also includes a three-year ban on entering Australia,’ Mr Dacic said. ‘It defies common sense.’ 

Victoria recorded 37,169 Covid infections – including 16,843 rapid antigen results – on Thursday, with a record high 953 patients in hospital and 111 in intensive care. 

DJOKOVIC COMES CLEAN ABOUT HIS COVID TESTS AND VISA DEBACLE 

‘I want to address the continuing misinformation about my activities and attendance at events in December in the lead-up to my positive Covid test result.

This is misinformation which needs to be corrected, particularly in the interest of alleviating broader concern in the community about my presence in Australia, and to address matters which are very hurtful and concerning to my family.

I want to emphasise that I have tried very hard to ensure the safety of everyone and my compliance with testing obligations.

I attended a basketball game in Belgrade on 14 December after which it was reported that a number of people tested positive to Covid-19.

Despite having no Covid symptoms, I took a rapid antigen test on 16 December which was negative, and out of an abundance of caution, also took an official and approved PCR test on that same day.

The next day I attended a tennis event in Belgrade to present awards to children and took a rapid antigen test before going to the event, and it was negative.

I was asymptomatic and felt good, and I had not received the notification of a positive PCR test until after that event.

The next day, on 18 December I was at my tennis centre in Belgrade to fulfil a long-standing commitment for a L’Équipe interview and photoshoot. I cancelled all other events except for the L’Equipe interview.

I felt obliged to go ahead and conduct the L’Équipe interview as I didn’t want to let the journalist down, but did ensure I socially distanced and wore a mask except when my photograph was taken.

Djokovic is pictured practising on Rod Laver Arena on Wednesday, ahead of his bid to win a tenth Australian Open crown

Djokovic is pictured practising on Rod Laver Arena on Wednesday, ahead of his bid to win a tenth Australian Open crown

When I went home after the interview to isolate for the required period, on reflection, this was an error of judgment and I accept that I should have rescheduled this commitment.

On the issue of my travel declaration, this was submitted by my support team on my behalf – as I told immigration officials on my arrival – and my agent sincerely apologises for the administrative mistake in ticking the incorrect box about my previous travel before coming to Australia.

This was a human error and certainly not deliberate. We are living in challenging times in a global pandemic and sometimes these mistakes can occur. Today, my team has provided additional information to the Australian government to clarify this matter.

While I felt it was important to address and clarify misinformation I will not be making any further comment out of utmost respect for the Australian government and their authorities and the current process.

It was always an honour and a privilege to play in the Australian Open. The Australian Open is much-loved by players, fans and the community, not just in Victoria and in Australia but around the globe, and I just want to have the opportunity to compete against the best players in the world and perform before one of the best crowds in the world.’

 



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