12.8 C
Sydney
Friday, May 20, 2022

Warning of ‘lone-wolf’ TERROR attacks by anti-vaxxers

Must read

Best Forex Signals for Copy Trading

Forex copy trading is becoming an increasingly popular way for traders to trade the markets. This trading method involves using signals generated by other...

5 Steps to Video Marketing Success: A Beginners Guide

Today, the market is cluttered with independent videographers, filmmakers, and video editors. The competition has moved far beyond the quality of your videos. The...

Cryptocurrency Is Building Resilience in World Markets

The volatility of cryptocurrency prices is often seen as negative by those who are unfamiliar with the space. However, this volatility is also one...

NDIS Scheme? Everything You Should Know

What do you think about the new NDIS meals? Well, if you are new to the term and have no idea about the same,...


Warning of ‘lone-wolf’ TERROR attacks by anti-vaxxers as lockdown protest groups splinter into more extreme factions threatening violence

  • Terror experts believe anti-vaxx movement could lead to lone wolf attacks
  • Far-right groups threatened executions of public figures including Alan Jones 
  • Growing fears ‘freedom’ rallies could splinter into dangerous acts from followers 


Far-right and anti-vaccine movements could result in individuals carrying out terror attacks after being radicalised by talk of martydom, taking up arms, and executions, experts fear.

The growing presence of extremist groups on social media within Australia has intelligence officials deeply concerned, after reports of neo-Nazis infiltrating and hijacking anti-vaccine rallies around the country.

Greg Barton, a professor at Deakin University who specialises in terrorism, fears Australia could start seeing attacks from ‘lone wolves’ inspired the the anti-lockdown and anti-vaccine ‘freedom’ movements. 

Terror experts fear far-right and anti-vaxx movements could result in lone attacks from radicalised followers, including martydom, taking up arms and even executions

‘My immediate worry is that an individual may decide to go and do something by themselves and it’s quite likely [to be] somebody who has got other issues going on in their life,’ he told The Age

Experts said the end of stay-at-home orders in Australia splintered the following of anti-lockdown protesters who are looking for other outlets to oppose the government.

The volatility of the movement and the people indoctrinated have agencies concerned the idea of ‘losing’ the battle could lead to dangerous behaviour.  

‘As people see that momentum start to ebb away, they start to switch from the sense that “we are winning”, to “we are losing”… they feel a need to escalate to some sort of really radical action,’ Strategic Dialogue intelligence analyst Elise Thomas said. 

One group’s leader recently asked followers what they were ‘willing to die for’ on social media, before labelling the self-immolation of a supporters’ body as a ‘heroic’ act.  

The volatility of the movements and the people indoctrinated have agencies concerned the idea of 'losing' the battle could lead to dangerous behaviour

The volatility of the movements and the people indoctrinated have agencies concerned the idea of ‘losing’ the battle could lead to dangerous behaviour

‘It’s got to the stage where we’re getting arms – archery, gun licences,’ another woman said. 

She later justified the words saying her followers were arming themselves to hunt for food due to shortages in diesel additives that threatened to ground the supply industry.

Among those inciting extremists is AustraliaOne Party’s Riccardo Bosi. 

He has threatened and encouraged executions of notable public figures, including Alan Jones, Peta Credlin, and Ita Buttrose for their silence over what they describe as ‘vaccine genocide’.

The former soldier, who leads an unrecognised political party called AustraliaOne, has appeared at several ‘freedom’ rallies, spewing his hatred and spreading his message on social media.

The growing presence of extremists groups on social media within Australia has intelligence officials deeply concerned, after reports of Neo-Nazi infiltrating and hijacking 'freedom' rallies around the country

The growing presence of extremists groups on social media within Australia has intelligence officials deeply concerned, after reports of Neo-Nazi infiltrating and hijacking ‘freedom’ rallies around the country

In a 60 Minutes story earlier this year director-general of ASIO Mike Burgess said right wing extremist groups now took up the majority of the intelligence agency’s work.

‘This is of grave concern to ASIO, and should be of grave concern to all Australians,’ he told the program. 

‘They are getting our full attention at this particular time. We’re seeing people as young as 16 and 17 in these groups, that concerns us.

‘They’re middle class, they’re well educated. They understand the ideology, they look like every day Australians and they’re not openly showing their violent beliefs.’

Advertisement





Source link

- Advertisement -

More articles

- Advertisement -

Latest article

Best Forex Signals for Copy Trading

Forex copy trading is becoming an increasingly popular way for traders to trade the markets. This trading method involves using signals generated by other...

5 Steps to Video Marketing Success: A Beginners Guide

Today, the market is cluttered with independent videographers, filmmakers, and video editors. The competition has moved far beyond the quality of your videos. The...

Cryptocurrency Is Building Resilience in World Markets

The volatility of cryptocurrency prices is often seen as negative by those who are unfamiliar with the space. However, this volatility is also one...

NDIS Scheme? Everything You Should Know

What do you think about the new NDIS meals? Well, if you are new to the term and have no idea about the same,...

What are the Best Options for Antivirus Software in 2022

Security software is essential in 2022. Cyber attacks against both businesses and individuals are increasing, and so it is a smart decision to purchase...